SINGAPORE PERMANENT RESIDENT APPLICATION 2014

Permanent Resident Application 2014

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Permanent Resident Application 2014 

Non-Singaporeans can become Singapore Permanent Residents (SPRs) by obtaining an Entry Permit. An application for an Entry Permit is an application for Singapore Permanent Residence. The following categories of foreigners are eligible to submit applications:

  • Spouse and unmarried children (below 21 years old) of a Singapore Citizen (SC)/Permanent Resident (SPR);
  • Aged parents of a Singapore Citizen;
  • P, Q or S work pass holders working in Singapore;
  • Investors/Entrepreneurs;
  • Foreigners who satisfy certain guidelines can apply for permanent residence by submitting applications through SMC Management Consultants Pte Ltd in Singapore.

Spouse and unmarried children of Singapore Citizen/Permanent Resident

For details of the requirements and application forms, please go to http://www.ica.gov.sg/e_services_overview.aspx?pageid=303&secid=302.

Applicants may submit their application and supporting documents through the Singapore Embassy. The Mission will not need to collect any processing fees on behalf of ICA. Upon approval of PR application, the successful applicant will have to complete the PR formalities in person at the ICA Building in Singapore. ICA itself does not collect processing fees and only collects certain fees for issuance of documents (fees to be paid directly to ICA at ICA itself will be clearly stated in the approval letter).

Singapore is accepting fewer new citizens and permanent residents because of growing resentment against foreigners. 

Singapore Permanent Residents Chart

The number of people given permanent resident status declined to 27,521 in 2011 from 29,265 in 2010. Far more people were allowed to become permanent residents in the previous three years: 59,460 people became permanent residents in 2009, 79,167 in 2009 and 63,627 in 2008.

The figures are from the Issues Paper:  Our Population, Our Future issued by the National Population and Talent Division of the Singapore government.  It says:

Our intake of new citizens increased from an average of 8,200 per year between 1987 and 2006, to about 18,500 per year in the last 5 years. We also took in an average of 58,000 Permanent Residents (PRs) per year between 2004 and 2008, but have tightened our immigration framework since late-2009 and reduced the intake to an average of 28,500 per year from 2010 onwards.

From 2007-2011, 48% of PRs were granted to working individuals, and the remaining were dependants (spouses and children) of SCs and PRs. 63% of all PRs granted were under 30 years old and they help to mitigate our ageing population. Most new PRs also have good educational qualifications. Of those aged 20 and above, 74% had a diploma or higher qualification.

Like PR applications, citizenship applications are subject to a holistic and thorough assessment process.

PRs are granted citizenship only after they have completed the Singapore Citizenship Journey and renounced their foreign citizenships. From 2007-2011, 38% of new SCs were granted to working individuals, while 62% were dependants. Like new PRs, new citizens are generally young and have good educational qualifications. 53% were under 30 years old, and of those over 20 years old, 61% had a diploma or higher qualification.

 

One thought on “SINGAPORE PERMANENT RESIDENT APPLICATION 2014

  1. Ecureilx

    hello.

    can anyone who got PR granted this year (2013) share his/her experience? (processing time, background, marital status, profession, etc). I have applied in january with my wife and been told by immigration officer that it would take 4 to 6 months. It has now gone beyond that timeline and we still havent got a reply (we regularly check the status on line). I am from western Europe and my wife is Malaysian chinese, both EP P1 holders earning >$10k each and been in singapore for 3 years. I know that PR applications are now under scrutinity with all the debate about foreign influx… I heard it could take up to 12 months…

    Would be good to hear of other similar cases/ experiences. thank you!

    Reply

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